How to Use a Monopod

While a robust, sturdy tripod is usually the best option for stabilizing your gear, there are instances when a monopod is handier and/or can help hold larger camera/lens combinations.monopods monopod camera how to use a monopod shooting stick how to use a monopod for video how to use a monopod selfie stick

We decided to share some pointers in keeping with Nasim’s mention in the Focus and Recompose Technique article that we would be doing some posts on basics and Tips for Beginners, and since we have had a couple of monopod reviews, we realized that some people may not know how to properly use a monopod. The biggest difference between the three approaches we’ll talk about is where you put the monopod’s foot.

Method 1: Straight Out in Front

The majority of people will utilize this method first because it is the most logical way to use a monopod. They will place the foot of the monopod roughly centered between their legs and straight out in front of them, forming a triangle with the photographer’s two feet, with their own legs square and spread to near shoulder width. This resembles a tripod in that the photographer provides two legs and the tripod provides the third.

The wrist strap should be used to firmly seat or drive the monopod foot into the ground in order to maximize stability. When you try it, you’ll notice that the strap isn’t just for carrying the monopod; it also serves to keep the monopod head from rotating on the foot as a pivot point. Some wrist straps can be overly lengthy, causing your hand to slip off the padded area of the leg, as we mentioned in our review of the Oben CTM-2500 Monopod. As a result, before choosing a monopod, I recommend examining the length of the wrist strap and observing where it places your hand.

When using a large telephoto lens, I prefer this method since the monopod leg is tipped at an angle with the other two, necessitating the employment of a monopod head to adjust the camera angle to maintain a level plane.

Method 2: Braced Against the Instep of Your Rear Foot

In this method, you stand with one foot slightly back and the foot of the monopod is positioned or braced up against the instep of the rear foot, with the pole pointed to the photographer’s other leg for additional bracing. Like in a first way, the hand is forcing the monopod into the ground with the hand on the shaft and the wrist strap pushing down as well.

Method 3: Between the Legs

In this method, you stand in the same way as in method 2, but the monopod’s leg passes between your legs, and the monopod’s foot is closer to, but behind, the leading foot. The monopod leg braces against the photographer’s leading leg to provide extra stability in this position. The monopod is pushed into the ground as usual.

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Using a Head on the Monopod

While many sports and wildlife photographers prefer to use the monopod without a head, a head can be utilized if desired; just make sure the head and screws can hold the weight of the camera and lens. From a simple tilt to a ball to a gimbal head, there’s something for everyone. Many people believe that because the monopod pivots and turns effortlessly, a simple tilt head is all that is required. If you want to use a monopod head, a ball head works well for landscape photos with a wide-angle lens, but a gimbal head is ideal for larger telephoto lenses.

FAQ

What is a monopod good for?

A monopod is designed to sustain the weight of your camera system while allowing you to use it comfortably. If you’re taking up your camera to snap pictures, that kind of defeats the purpose. As a result, you need to use a monopod to raise the camera to your eye level.

Do you need a head with a monopod?

While many sports and wildlife photographers prefer to use the monopod without a head, a head can be utilized if desired; just make sure the head and screws can hold the weight of the camera and lens. From a simple tilt to a ball to a gimbal head, there’s something for everyone.

What’s better monopod or tripod?

Monopods are more mobile than tripods, which are more sturdy. Long exposure photography and macro work benefit from the use of tripods. Monopods are ideal for keeping long lenses steady while photographing sports on the go. It’s possible that you’ll require both stability and mobility.

How do you attach a monopod?

This is perhaps the most basic way to utilize a monopod, but it’s still the major reason I opted to buy one. The approach is simple: attach your camera to the top of the monopod, as usual, extend the legs as far as they will go, lock them out, and then raise the monopod high enough to obtain the photo you want.

Is monopod good for video?

A monopod is a great tool for traveling videographers who want a little more stability and production value. They’re small, light, and portable, as well as being reasonably priced.

Conclusion

The key line is that bracing the monopod against another portion of your body when possible can improve stability. Try out each option to determine which one suits your needs and shooting style the best. It’s entirely up to you which type of head to use if any at all. Finally, we’d love for you to share how you utilize your monopod in the comments section below, as we all learn from one other.

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